6 Wonderfully Woven Pieces That Make A Statement

ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN | BY | September 12, 2019

Six standout pieces incorporate traditional weaving techniques for a very modern effect.

Full Circuit

LX_COM27_Market_Spotlight_02

Hand-knotted in Nepal, the stunning silk and wool Archetype Lake Runner by Kelly Wearstler for The Rug Company was inspired by Bauhaus style with its series of undulating geometric shapes. therugcompany.com

Chain Link

LX_COM27_Market_Spotlight_05

Centuries old and commonly used on medieval battlefields, woven chain mail is the focal point of the aptly named Armor Collection by Konekt. The intricately woven stainless steel is draped over the striking metal side table bases, offered in triangular or cylindrical versions. konektfurniture.com

Smoke and Mirrors

LX_COM27_Market_Spotlight_06

Mexico-based designer Laura Kirar’s first artisan furnishings collection includes the Mayan Baroque Mirror, which evokes the divine serpent where there is no beginning or end. The mirror is wrapped in hand-harvested, hand-dyed, and hand-spun lengua de vaca fiber from the Yucatan, a material that has been used in traditional craft since ancient times. maisongerard.com

Stitch Fix

LX_COM27_Market_Spotlight_04

The ethereal Interlude Sconce from master light makers Apparatus presents a hand- embroidered brass mesh cage suspended around an illuminated alabaster core. Decorating the piece are intricate dimensional beading and threadwork that form an organic design and a tangible interpretation of a musical score. apparatusstudio.com

To Dye For

LX_COM27_Market_Spotlight_01

A modern take on the Egyptian royal throne, the BC Chair from Canadian Troy Smith is certainly substantial with a solid brass base that grounds the piece. Drawing from one of the oldest furniture-making techniques, the designer chose caning to complete the back and seat, which is dyed a very contemporary shade of turquoise. troysmithdesigns.com

Geometric Sequence

LX_COM27_Market_Spotlight_07

Screen #2 is a classic Martino Gamper work featuring no parallel lines and often overlooked materials like linoleum and blockboard. The Italian designer worked with one of London’s greatest caners to create the woven elements that are installed on both sides of the screen, producing a moire effect. antonkerngallery.com

PHOTOS: WILL AND SUSAN BRINSON

More From Market



Leave a Reply