2 Arizona Projects Focused On Energy Efficiency

ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN | BY | March 16, 2018

When it comes to innovative construction, a new must-have is topping developers’ lists: eco-friendliness. Here, a look at two dynamic valley projects where energy efficiency is front and center.

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RENDERING, BEAUTY AND THE BIT, COURTESY STUDIO MA

By 2020, science professors at Arizona State University will teach in an environment that reflects their subjects. Phoenix’s Studio Ma is designing a net-zero energy, waste and greenhouse-gas emissions complex for the Tempe college’s interdisciplinary science and technology programs. Made of a timber frame, the building will consist of an atrium filled with water and air-purifying plants. Solar panels will trap carbon dioxide and power the complex, while sunshades will cool the interior. Outside, wetlands will collect rainwater, and an adjacent structure will recycle sewage. Although in good hands with architect Christiana Moss, principal of the firm, the project also received critical input from valuable resources: ASU scientists themselves.

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PHOTOS: BILL TIMMERMAN

Because of its eco-efficiencies, a new boutique luxury residential development in Scottsdale is being recognized by the city as a green building. Eldorado on 1st, which opened in late 2017 in the arts district, consists of seven units outfitted with elements like Nest thermostats, LED light fixtures and smart-technology recirculating water pumps that “learn” a resident’s hot-water usage, scheduling operations accordingly. Designed by architect Will Bruder, who constructed the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, each unit boasts features like a Bulthaup kitchen, 10-foot ceilings and a terrace along with time-tested materials ideal for desert living, such as masonry walls and concrete floor slabs. Amid the four-story building’s sleek architecture, residents also enjoy a custom art installation by Jay Atherton, titled Four Points for Contemplation.

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