A Flatware Line Honoring American Craftsmanship

There is something to be said for finding the right fit, especially when it comes to honoring a design brand’s legacy. So, when the Sausalito, California-based ceramics and home goods company Heath Ceramics was looking for an American manufacturer to round out its tabletop offerings with its first-ever flatware line, it discovered exactly who to turn to: Sherrill Manufacturing. “We have a deep affinity for companies with heritage and for those remaining when all others have gone elsewhere,” says Heath Ceramics co-owner Robin Petravic of Sherrill.

Sherrill, founded by Matt Roberts and Greg Owens in New York in 2005, is now the only flatware brand that makes its products in the United States–an enormous source of pride for its founders. “We grew up in this community,” Roberts says. “And we’re survivors.”Despite the nearly 3,000-miles between the two companies, “we walked hand-in-hand down the path together,” remarks Roberts.

The result is a five-piece cutlery collection called Muir, the first of three flatware designs by Heath Ceramics(the last two lines are set to launch later this year). The pieces–two forks, two spoons and a knife–honor both brands’ history and devotion to American craftsmanship by showcasing a timeless and humble design with smooth edges, elegant lines and a satisfying grip.

Heath Ceramics and Sherill challenged each other’s perceived limits of manufacturing and design, producing a collection that reflects its shared values and honest spirit committed to craft. “It’s not just about design–it’s also about respect for materials,” says Heath’s Studio Director Tung Chiang, who collaborated with Roberts on the collection. Through their partnership, Chiang learned of Sherrill’s nearly 20-step manufacturing process and the significance of a special tool: a tumbling mechanism built by Sherrill that lends a distinct matte finish to the pieces.

The Muir collection, available in polished or tumbled finishes, was designed to accompany Heath Ceramics’ founder Edith Heath’s original Coupe dinnerware designs–another nod to an enduring legacy.

PHOTOS: JEFFERY CROSS