How Objects Found In Nature Inspire Joan Winter

ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN | BY | October 4, 2017
Joan Winters
D

allas artist Joan Winter‘s training in space planning and design under several architecture firms allows her to move effortlessly across different mediums including sculpture, oil painting and printmaking. And while found objects in nature like leaves and shells inspire her work, Winter’s process involves deliberate and multi-step processes. “Architecture draws from nature,” she says. “My work invites the viewer to take a closer look at its underlying forms.”

Read on to learn more about the artist.

What is your most treasured creation?

One is a small spiral sculpture, Live Center, that I made in 2006 when I was learning to use a lathe. I enjoy its lively spirit and the natural wood texture of the maple. Another is the Sunlight Series: Daybreak, Rising Sun and Sundown. I enjoyed studying the sky and recording color at different times of day over many months and creating the suggestion of changing natural light conditions during a period of time.

What’s one destination for someone to add to their bucket list?

For sure, Japan. I love Kyoto’s quiet simplicity, ancient temples and gardens and contemporary architecture. I always encourage people to stay at one of the traditional Ryokan-style Japanese guesthouses. I also recommend the nearby island of Awaji; it’s an hour away from Kyoto and you can only travel there by bridge. It’s such a beautiful place to learn about Japanese culture and to see architect Tadao Ando’s Awaji Yumebutai International Conference Center.

What’s the best gift you’ve ever received?

The hand-blown wine glasses given to us by an architect friend. They are so beautiful, delicate and rare. The glass is blown with an almost transparent image in the glass. I don’t know how it was created, but it’s inspired a painting that I am working on now.

Who would you invite to your dream dinner party?

Rebecca Salter, a British artist who recently had a solo show at the Yale Center for British Art; Claire Cuccio, who has a PhD in Japanese from Stanford and a specialized interest in Tanka poetry; and Paul Furneaux, a tremendous artist, working primarily in Mokuhanga. All four of us are working on an international Mokuhanga exhibition, so our dinner would be enlightening and possibly bring our exhibition to reality.

PHOTOS: TERRI GLANGER

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